The unexpectedly delightful work of Peter de Krom

by Lindsey Welch

I recently discovered the work of Peter de Krom when browsing the site, iN-PUBLiC for research in my own thesis project. If you have not heard of iN-PUBLiC before, it is a collective that was established in 2000 by Nick Turpin, and acts as an international home for street photography in its many forms and influencers [1]. Their mission is to promote street photography and continue to explore its possibilities. Their site features portfolio samples, photographer interviews, a photographers directory including the masters of the genre, and plenty of other resources such as links and work shops.

 iN-PUBLiC About Page

iN-PUBLiC About Page

iN-PUBLiC has a running blog that includes interviews with photographers whose focus is street and candid photography. It was in these features that I ran across the work of Peter de Krom, a photographer whose work I have come to be thrilled by. My own work, while existing on ‘the streets’ isn’t actually street photography because I am not making images of incidents and candid life as it is happening, however I found this photographer’s work to carry the same kind of strange awkwardness I seek in my own project. In an interview on iN-PUBLiC, posted on February 21st 2017, Krom said “I’m always trying to understand why the people who consider themselves ‘normal’ seem to be so weird. Photography, for me, is the perfect tool to help me with this.” [2] .

 Peter de Krom

Peter de Krom

A photographer in his 30’s, he brings an eye that is distinctly influenced by the likes of Meyerowitz, Mermelstein and Parr. Krom works and lives in The Netherlands, specifically Hoek van Holland, where much of his work was made. This area has set the stage for the kind of wit and cleverness evident in his photos. He has a unique eye for the strangeness of on goings around him and some interesting ideas about larger narratives in his work. For example, his project “Scootrangers”, he followed around a club of mobility scooter users for three years [3].

“[I] even went on holidays with them. For the story I photographed the club in a very constant way to emphasize their behavior as a group, as if they are a herd of animals migrating across the country. It not only shows the good Dutch healthcare system but also the striving of the older generation to still make the best of their (limited) lifestyle. It’s a glimpse of the future and a beautiful reminder that we’re not so different from herds of animals looking for a better life while migrating.”

 Peter de Krom, Scootrangers

Peter de Krom, Scootrangers

 Peter de Krom, Scootrangers

Peter de Krom, Scootrangers

Some of the stranger sets in on his site, the statement is lost on me due to the language barrier, but the photos are no less strange and wonderful. In example, the work in his sets “Stokstaartjes”, which Google tells me means “Meerkat”, visualizes images of pretty regular seeming people are partially nude or wearing minimal clothing in public. There seems to be an interesting theme here. Regardless of being able to read his statement, the intent behind the images seems somewhat clear.

 Peter de Krom, Stokstaartjes.

Peter de Krom, Stokstaartjes.

When asked, on iN-PUBLiC, why make photos, he replies:

“Maybe I secretly hope that I contribute to ways that people reflect more on life, with humor and distance, as if they’re watching a nature documentary about their own species. We need this, especially now. We are so more special and strange then we think, especially if you look up through a telescope at night instead of straight through a camera during the day.”

Krom’s approach to people from the perspective of an outside observer is one that I find completely relatable, an approach that is inspiring and fascinating to watch.

 Peter de Krom

Peter de Krom

 Peter de Krom

Peter de Krom

[1] iN-PUBLiC About Homepage. < http://in-public.com/about/ >

[2] iN-PUBLiC Interview with Peter de Krom. < http://in-public.com/interview-with-peter-de-krom/ >

[3] Peterdekrom.com, Scootrnagers. < http://peterdekrom.com/scootrangers/ >

[4] Peter de Krom’s homepage. < http://peterdekrom.com >

[5] Peter de Krom on Flickr. < https://www.flickr.com/people/pdk/ >

[6] Peter de Krom on Lensculture. < https://www.lensculture.com/peter-de-krom >